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what does cbd stand for in weed

CBD is the abbreviation for cannabidiol. It’s one of the primary compounds found in the cannabis plant. After tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), an intoxicating compound, CBD is the second-most abundant cannabinoid in the cannabis plant. However, unlike THC, CBD is non-intoxicating – meaning it won’t make users feel high.

In addition, our bodies consist of several other receptor proteins that work in the ECS, like GPR3, GPR6, TRPV1, and TRPV2. CBD binds to all of these, and many of its pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory effects may occur through these pathways.

CBD: What Is It?

With its recent rise in popularity, there has been a lot more interest surrounding CBD.

The benefits of CBD are likely due to the sum of its effects on several of the biological pathways, not just one in particular. However, a lot more research is required to fully understand how CBD helps with conditions such as seizures and anxiety.

While THC is an agonist of the CB1 receptors, CBD is an inverse agonist. This means it can block some of THC’s intoxicating effects that are enacted via that receptor.

CBD stands for cannabidiol. It is the second most prevalent of the active ingredients of cannabis (marijuana). While CBD is an essential component of medical marijuana, it is derived directly from the hemp plant, which is a cousin of the marijuana plant. While CBD is a component of marijuana (one of hundreds), by itself it does not cause a "high." According to a report from the World Health Organization, "In humans, CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential…. To date, there is no evidence of public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD."

Cannabidiol (CBD) has been recently covered in the media, and you may have even seen it as an add-in booster to your post-workout smoothie or morning coffee. What exactly is CBD? Why is it suddenly so popular?

How is cannabidiol different from marijuana?

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CBD may offer an option for treating different types of chronic pain. A study from the European Journal of Pain showed, using an animal model, CBD applied on the skin could help lower pain and inflammation due to arthritis. Another study demonstrated the mechanism by which CBD inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain, two of the most difficult types of chronic pain to treat. More study in humans is needed in this area to substantiate the claims of CBD proponents about pain control.

Side effects of CBD include nausea, fatigue and irritability. CBD can increase the level in your blood of the blood thinner coumadin, and it can raise levels of certain other medications in your blood by the exact same mechanism that grapefruit juice does. A significant safety concern with CBD is that it is primarily marketed and sold as a supplement, not a medication. Currently, the FDA does not regulate the safety and purity of dietary supplements. So, you cannot know for sure that the product you buy has active ingredients at the dose listed on the label. In addition, the product may contain other (unknown) elements. We also don’t know the most effective therapeutic dose of CBD for any particular medical condition.