Posted on

is cbd oil legal in nc

This article lists the best CBD oil stores in North Carolina, and we also clarify the state’s legal framework for cannabis.

If you’re a natural-born researcher, we suggest that you shop for CBD oil online. As we said, many decent manufacturers ship their products to North Carolina, so obtaining CBD oil through their websites may be the quickest and easiest way to do so.

Where to Buy CBD Oil in North Carolina?

Nonetheless, let us not forget that since 2014, all states have been granted the right to cultivate and research the industrial hemp variety of the cannabis plant. This, in turn, means that hemp-derived CBD oil is widely available in North Carolina, regardless of its harsh laws on both the medical and recreational use of marijuana.

As we speak, marijuana for recreational purposes remains illegal in North Carolina. However, even for a zero-tolerance state, North Carolina managed to show some human kindness in 2014 by passing House Bill 1220 – also known as the Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act. The bill grants some children the right to use a hemp extract with THC levels under 0.9%, and CBD levels of at least 5%, for untreatable epilepsy to help control their illness and reduce symptoms.

Here’s what you need to know about differences in the legality of marijuana and hemp-derived CBD oil.

A large reason for this is that the Federal Controlled Substances Act classes marijuana as a prohibited drug.

State laws often contradict federal laws when it comes to marijuana. Unfortunately, North Carolina has some of the harshest marijuana laws in the United States.

The first steps taken toward medical marijuana in North Carolina happened in 2014 when the State Government passed the Hope 4 Haley and Friends Act.

Penalties for Marijuana Possession in North Carolina

Since the Federal Government passed the 2014 Farm Bill, farmers can legally grow industrial hemp as an agricultural crop used to make clothing, food, fuel, and extracts.

According to the Federal Government, marijuana is a Schedule 1 drug, which means it has the following qualities:

You shouldn’t have any trouble finding CBD oil locally if you visit your closest vape shop. They will typically have several options sold over the counter or the staff can point you in the right direction.

YES! Despite North Carolina’s strict laws against marijuana, you can still legally purchase CBD oil.

To possess hemp extract with 0.9% THC, patients and caregivers must submit a North Carolina Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act Caregiver Registration Application. This application can be filled out online or sent to the North Carolina Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS). The program is only open to patients suffering from intractable epilepsy.

There are no requirements or laws governing the production or sales of hemp-derived CBD with less than 0.3% THC. CBD is not approved by the FDA as a food or beverage additive or as an over-the-counter remedy for any condition. Suppliers need to adhere to federal guidelines and not make any false claims. Additional labeling guidelines can be found below in the section on CBD labels.

To meet federal legal criteria, CBD oil must contain no more than 0.3 percent THC. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

North Carolina CBD possession limits

Broad-spectrum means that the product contains CBD and terpenes, but has undergone additional processes to strip out any THC.

It is legal to purchase hemp-derived CBD online, as long as it contains less than 0.3% THC. The United States Postal Service (USPS) and private delivery services are permitted to mail hemp-derived CBD items to North Carolina addresses. There are a growing number of stores and retail outlets that carry hemp-derived CBD products in North Carolina, in addition to online retailers.

Where CBD is legal, consumers should seek out only products with the following information on the label:

The Farm Bill also shifted oversight of hemp-derived products to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), giving the agency the ability to regulate CBD’s labeling, therapeutic claims, and its use as a food additive. Despite the passage of the Farm Bill, the FDA has taken the stance that even hemp-derived CBD may not be added to food and beverages, nor can this non-intoxicating cannabinoid be marketed as a dietary supplement.