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drugs that interact with cbd oil

Furthermore, most prescription medications used to manage these conditions are metabolized by cytochrome P450, making it entirely possible that CBD could interfere with—rather than enhance—treatment.

“Herbal products are drugs,” says Rita Alloway, Pharm.D. , research professor of nephrology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. “Just because [something] is herbal … doesn’t mean it can’t interact with any of the pharmaceutically manufactured drugs that you may be taking.”

And shoppers are buying it, so to speak—one recent report indicated that CBD sales are expected to hit $16 billion by 2026, up from just over $1 billion in 2018. But what exactly is CBD, and is it safe for people who are using prescription medications? Before using it, it’s important to learn about the potential CBD drug interactions.

Does CBD interact with medications?

Despite the not-so-great news about CBD for patients using tacrolimus, for some people, CBD is actually life-changing in a positive way. In 2018, for example, the CBD-derived medication Epidiolex received FDA approval for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, two very rare and very severe forms of epilepsy.

CBD is thought to act on certain receptors in your brain and other parts of the body, in ways that could relieve pain, or help certain health conditions, like childhood seizure disorders. However, as with any “natural” product, the fact that it comes from plants doesn’t automatically render it innocuous. For some people, particularly those taking certain prescription medications, using CBD is risky. It has anticoagulant effects that can thin blood; it can also modestly lower blood pressure. These effects could be dangerous for people with certain medical conditions.

If you’ve visited a store that sells health and beauty products lately, you may have noticed that products containing CBD, or cannabidiol, seem to be all the rage. Oil, chocolate, supplements, even carbonated beverages, are filling up shelves—enticing shoppers with claims that using one of these products will cure insomnia, alleviate anxiety, reduce inflammation, or treat PTSD.

As for other drugs, well, most haven’t been studied yet. There is preliminary evidence that CBD could have a similar effect to grapefruit juice, impairing how your body metabolizes drugs, and raising serum levels of those medications in your body. And, because cytochrome P450 is responsible for the metabolism of numerous medications , proceed with caution before mixing any prescription pharmaceutical with CBD, Dr. Alloway says.

In yet another such study, but with researchers this time looking into the clinical implications and importance of DDIs between anticancer agents and CBD in patients with cancer, the reviewers found that there was limited information available, with most of the data coming from in vitro studies and that the true in vivo implications are not well-known. This lead them to believe that erring on the side of caution is the best option, and that doctors and pharmacists should always consider the possibility of interactions and their consequences whenever they are aware of a patient using CBD products.

Just like food has to go through this process, so too does a therapeutic compound such as CBD, but in what is more specifically called drug metabolism. Drug metabolism refers to the rate at which medications and other therapeutic compounds are broken down by the body into its individual metabolites and how long these metabolites stay in the body.

At the very least these elevated concentrations can cause unwanted side effects like an increased risk of bleeding or a suppressed immune system, but more worryingly, it can quite easily result in an overdose.

CBD and anticancer agents

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is one of over a 100 different types of a specific kind of compound called phytocannabinoids found in the Cannabis sativa plant.

It does through a system called the cytochrome P450 system (CYP) which consists of a special group of enzymes containing heme as a cofactor to convert fat-soluble compounds into more water-soluble compounds and aiding in their absorption and use.

MyDosage isn’t just about you. It’s about all of us. Over time, the app will continue to learn which products and dosages deliver the best results for certain conditions. Meaning every time you give feedback, you’ll be helping someone else find their best dosage faster.

This, along with the rise in the popularity of the medical and complimentary use of CBD, researchers are also starting to investigate drug interactions with CBD more directly.