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does cbd oil show up in a drug test

There are certain things you can do if you use a CBD product to prevent you from failing a drug test. These include:

Your best bet is to do your research, and take the utmost caution when buying a CBD product to ensure it’s pure, particularly if you must undergo a drug test.

There are a few reasons why you’d fail a CBD drug test.

How to Avoid a Positive CBD Drug Test

Many individuals have taken CBD as a natural remedy for various ailments. CBD is being promoted for alleviating chronic pain, insomnia, anxiety, and many other ailments. While there is still ongoing research on those uses, there is certain science behind the CBD compound. The FDA, last year, approved a drug that contains CBD known as Epidiolex to treat certain severe, but rare seizures.

Tiny amounts of THC in material CBD is extracted from could end up in the CBD product in high enough amounts that would trigger a positive drug test. This is more likely to occur when the CBD product is bought from a cannabis dispensary in locations where cannabis is legal.

But, CBD products can cause problems when it comes to a drug test. It can be tricky. That is, drug tests screening for THC that have CBD in them might come back positive, since a lot of CBD products do contain trace amounts of THC in them that tests will detect in your bloodstream.

Inadvertent marijuana exposure (through secondhand smoke) isn’t likely to be enough for you to end up with a positive result on your drug test. But, if you’re in a room with heavy marijuana smokers for a few hours, it could cause you to inhale enough THC smoke that could result in a positive drug test.

To obtain a CBD drug test, an entity would have to pay a testing company to develop a CBD test and to change their testing regimen to include it. When you consider that this non-intoxicating compound won’t get you high or impair your ability at work, there’s really no need for a CBD drug test.

Whichever method, or methods, you choose, be sure to buy from a reputable source and check the label carefully. Since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hasn’t established guidelines for CBD products, it’s buyer beware. Avoid any product making health claims like that it cures or treats anything specific. Most reputable CBD producers typically include the following information on their product labels:

Some concerned consumers may wonder if a CBD-specific test exists. Technically, since CBD is a chemical that your body metabolizes, a specific test could be developed to detect it. But the average drug test is not designed to identify usage of CBD or CBD oil specifically.

There is no such a thing as a CBD drug test

There is mounting evidence that hair follicle drug testing methods are not able to accurately detect marijuana. Research published in the journal Scientific Reports suggests that the presence of THC and THC metabolites can be transferred to the hair follicles of non-consumers through contact with hands, sweat, or exhaled smoke.

THC and its metabolites can also be detected in the saliva of occasional and chronic users. A 2014 study published in the journal Drug Testing and Analysis looked at cannabinoids in oral fluid and found that THC metabolites were detectable in the saliva of occasional users for one to three days and chronic users for up to 29 days.

Although hemp-derived CBD products are available in states where recreational cannabis isn’t legal, some people might worry whether CBD will show up on a drug test. It’s a valid concern considering that even CBD products derived from hemp are legally permitted to contain traces of THC, 0.3% or less to be exact. And even in states where it is legal to buy THC-heavy cannabis from a retail store, some employers still screen employees for cannabis use. This may leave some consumers wondering whether there’s a small amount of THC in their CBD — and whether that will show up on a drug test.

While it’s possible that small amounts of THC that exist within a CBD product could accumulate and show up in a drug test, it’s still highly unlikely. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps