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cbd research studies

In this article, we cover the following areas of cannabidiol research:

Last but not least, CBD can counter the psychoactive effects of THC — the primary psychoactive cannabinoid. At higher doses, THC can backfire, having a negative effect on anxiety. This is why modern cannabis breeders aim at increasing the CBD content in their cannabis strains to reduce the anxiety-inducing effects for their customers.

Research on Cannabidiol for Anxiety

Did you just see yourself when reading the above? Then you need to read our guide on choosing CBD oil for pain relief — with CFAH’s recommendations based on our own experience.

Research on cannabidiol has gone a long way since it first started in the late 1980s. With the progressing legalization across the United States, scientists are now eager to delve deeper into the effects and benefits of CBD oil and the cannabis plant in general.

All in all, cannabidiol has a great chance of becoming a natural and safe alternative to treating long-term joint inflammation and various forms of arthritis.

In our survey, sleep was the second-highest-ranking reason for CBD use. We found that 42.5% used CBD to help with sleep, which is higher than for previously published data on adult CBD users, where it was the fifth-highest reason (Corroon and Phillips 2018). It is well-known that a lack of sleep can cause a variety of physical and mental health effects including raised levels of cortisol(Leproult et al. 1997), anxiety (Babson et al. 2010), and mood disturbances (Brazeau et al. 2010), and both short and long duration of sleep is a significant predictor of death (Cappuccio et al. 2010). A recent controlled study of 300 mg CBD found no effect on any sleep indices (Linares et al. 2018), whilst observational and cross-sectional studies showed improvement in sleep outcomes (Corroon and Phillips 2018; Gulbransen et al. 2020). Preclinical studies have shown mixed results with some doses showing an increase in total sleep time (Chagas et al. 2013) and another study indicating that CBD causes increased wakefulness (Murillo-Rodríguez et al. 2006). Thus, the research on CBD and sleep thus far is mixed. However, as sedation and somnolence are regarded as common adverse effects of CBD in a meta-analysis of clinical trials where high doses are used (Chesney et al. 2020), it may not be surprising that CBD at low doses improved sleep quality and duration.

When used in high doses, somnolence is a primary adverse effect (Machado Bergamaschi et al. 2011). Patients in CBD clinical trials were more likely to experience sedation (OR 4.21, 95% CI 1.18–15.01) and somnolence (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.07–4.64) in comparison to placebo (Chesney et al. 2020). Despite this preclinical and experimental research, there is a lack of human clinical trials to establish the efficacy and appropriate CBD indications fully. The effective dose for most of the above indications is still to be determined. In much of the research, high doses of CBD are used (between 300 and 1200 mg), whilst at the same time, globally, millions of CBD users are using low dose CBD. Thus, a disconnect exists between clinical research and the current state of the market.

Reasons for cannabidiol use amongst 397 adult cannabidiol users who were allowed to respond to more than one option leading to a total of 1622 responses. Y-axis represents percentage based on total responses

Strengths and limitations

Compared with people not using CBD for anxiety, those who did self-medicate used CBD multiple times a day (aOR 3.44, [95% CI 1.70, 7.00], p = 0.001). Moreover, compared with those not using CBD for self-perceived stress, those who were self-medicating also used CBD multiple times a day (aOR 1.97, [95% CI 1.034–3.77], p = 0.039). Those using CBD for sleep improvement had greater odds of using CBD in the evening (aOR 3.02, [95% CI 1.86, 4.93], p ≤ 0.001) and lower odds of using CBD in the morning (aOR 0.157, [95% CI 0.07–0.38], p ≤ 0.001). Those using CBD for self-perceived anxiety had lower odds of using CBD in the evening (aOR 0.56, [95% CI 0.14–0.45], p ≤ 0.001). No associations emerged between those who did and did not use CBD for self-perceived stress on the time of day they used CBD.

42.6% endorsed using CBD for self-perceived anxiety, followed by 37.5% for stress, 37% for general health and wellbeing, and 37% for improving sleep (see Fig. 1). 24.6% reported use for self-perceived insomnia. Overall, 42.5% of respondents said they were using CBD for some sleep issue, either to improve sleep or for self-perceived insomnia. In the supplementary materials (see Table 2), we show reasons for use broken down by sex, age, and location.

Given the low quality of CBD available on the market, it may be that these individuals were not taking CBD, or that CBD is not efficacious in sleep, so many individuals report better sleep by virtue of the placebo effect, fuelled by marketing (Haney 2020). Another reason may be that CBD is acting on other aspects of stress and anxiety that indirectly reduce sleep problems. Still, in this survey, participants directly attributed improved sleep to CBD. This points to the need for RCTs, as the effect of expectations (i.e. the result of the placebo effect), particularly with compounds advertised as cure-alls (Haney 2020). Suggesting that the placebo effect may contribute to the purported impact of CBD does not reject the potential medical value of CBD, but it does mean we must be wary of the results of observational studies (Haney 2020).

Logistic regression on location purchased (CBD shop or other) found that those who lived outside of the UK (aOR 2.286, [95% CI 1.35–3.86], p = 0.002) and males (aOR 1.75, [95% CI 1.06–2.88], p = 0.02) had greater odds of purchasing CBD from an “other” location. Each of the primary disorders was included in the model individually, and did not significantly alter the model and were not associated with location purchased.

Cannabidiol (CBD) has been recently covered in the media, and you may have even seen it as an add-in booster to your post-workout smoothie or morning coffee. What exactly is CBD? Why is it suddenly so popular?

Side effects of CBD include nausea, fatigue and irritability. CBD can increase the level in your blood of the blood thinner coumadin, and it can raise levels of certain other medications in your blood by the exact same mechanism that grapefruit juice does. A significant safety concern with CBD is that it is primarily marketed and sold as a supplement, not a medication. Currently, the FDA does not regulate the safety and purity of dietary supplements. So, you cannot know for sure that the product you buy has active ingredients at the dose listed on the label. In addition, the product may contain other (unknown) elements. We also don’t know the most effective therapeutic dose of CBD for any particular medical condition.

How is cannabidiol different from marijuana?

Some CBD manufacturers have come under government scrutiny for wild, indefensible claims, such that CBD is a cure-all for cancer, which it is not. We need more research but CBD may be prove to be an option for managing anxiety, insomnia, and chronic pain. Without sufficient high-quality evidence in human studies we can’t pinpoint effective doses, and because CBD is currently is mostly available as an unregulated supplement, it’s difficult to know exactly what you are getting. If you decide to try CBD, talk with your doctor — if for no other reason than to make sure it won’t affect other medications you are taking.

CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.

CBD may offer an option for treating different types of chronic pain. A study from the European Journal of Pain showed, using an animal model, CBD applied on the skin could help lower pain and inflammation due to arthritis. Another study demonstrated the mechanism by which CBD inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain, two of the most difficult types of chronic pain to treat. More study in humans is needed in this area to substantiate the claims of CBD proponents about pain control.