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cbd oil schedule 1

According to federal law, no prescriptions may be written for Schedule I substances, and they are not readily available for clinical use.

NOTE: Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, marijuana) is still considered a Schedule 1 drug by the DEA, even though some U.S. states have legalized marijuana for personal, recreational use or for medical use.

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A substance does not need to be listed as a controlled substance by the DEA to be treated as a Schedule I substance for criminal prosecution. A controlled substance analogue (for example, a “designer drug”) is a substance which is structurally or pharmacologically similar to a Schedule I or Schedule II substance, specifically used for human consumption, and is not an approved medication in the United States.

The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) schedule information displayed above applies to drugs or substances regulated under federal law. There may be variations in CSA schedules between individual states and federal law. For example, some drugs or compounds may be deemed a schedule I drug or may be listed in a different schedule in a state’s specific controlled substance act, which may differ from the federal controlled substance act.

Schedule I drugs are those that have the following characteristic according to the United States Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA):

Under federal law, CBD that is derived from cannabis plants with more than .3% THC is considered illegal, as the intoxicating cannabinoid remains a Schedule I substance. If the cannabis plant has more than .3% THC, then all substances derived from it — including any CBD extracted from the plant — are considered by the DEA to be a federally restricted Schedule I substance.

Federal classification of CBD is one of the biggest areas of confusion still surrounding CBD, CBD oil, and other CBD-infused products, leaving some to wonder: Is CBD or CBD oil a Schedule I drug?

Two of the most abundant cannabinoids produced by the cannabis plant are THC, which produces the plant’s renowned intoxicating effects, and CBD, which is a non-intoxicating compound and appears to provide many therapeutic and medicinal qualities. This combination of cannabis compounds are also key in understanding how the Schedule I classification applies to CBD products.

Is CBD a Schedule 1 drug?

However, the list of FDA approved drugs that contain cannabis-derived compounds remains limited to a single CBD-based product: an epilepsy medicine called Epidiolex, made by GW Pharmaceuticals. Any other medication is technically not approved under federal law and would, therefore, be considered illegal at the federal level, which is why CBD producers are not permitted to make health claims about their products.

If you’re referring to a substance that can be used for medicinal applications, then yes, many people would consider CBD to be a drug that generally promotes health and wellness. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Whether CBD is considered a drug ultimately depends on your definition of the word “drug.” On the one hand, if you’re referring to a substance that can be used for medicinal applications, then yes, many people would consider CBD to be a drug that generally promotes health and wellness. This position is backed up by the rapidly growing body of research pointing to CBD’s far-reaching wellness, therapeutic, and medicinal qualities.

According to the FDA, CBD derived from hemp plants is still not approved for use in medicinal products or in food and drink products. In September 2018, prior to the passage of the 2018 Hemp Farming Bill, the DEA released a statement announcing that CBD products that had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and contain less with THC levels below .1% would be classified as a Schedule V substance.