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cbd oil michigan

Again, you can buy marijuana-derived CBD oil in Michigan even without a medical card, but if the amount isn’t sufficient to meet your health needs, you’ll need to register with the state’s program and get a medical card.

Don’t fly with marijuana-derived CBD oil or marijuana products. Again, marijuana is illegal under federal law, and flying with one can land you in legal problems.

The popularity of CBD’s health benefits has easily made it a household name, but it’s created a lot of confusion from a legal perspective as well.

Do You Need a Medical Card to Buy CBD Oil in Michigan?

Moreover, buying CBD oil online gives you discounts when you buy in bulk or freebies when you sign up.

Traveling with CBD oil should be fine within Michigan and when crossing state borders, as long as the CBD oil is derived from hemp and contains no more than 0.3% THC.

Registered patients need to present their valid registry identification cards to buy medical marijuana.

Being a registered patient with a valid card gives you the advantage of legally possessing more marijuana products for medical use.

You should have no problem tracking down your favorite CBD products in Michigan. Now that marijuana is legal, you will see CBD pop up in stores across the state.

CBD is useful as a treatment for many different medical conditions and offers relief from seizures, pain, anxiety, and inflammation. Researchers have discovered more medicinal applications as the Federal Government relaxes the laws regarding marijuana and increases research funding.

How to Buy CBD in Michigan

Since 2014, CBD derived from industrial hemp has been legal to purchase across the United States thanks to the Agricultural Act.

If you fit those qualities, then you will need to download and complete the Michigan Medical Marijuana Program application found here and schedule an appointment with a state-licensed marijuana doctor.

For those of you waiting for recreational dispensaries to open up, you’re looking at about two years before they’re ready for business.

The 2018 Farm Bill shifted the oversight of hemp and hemp-derived products from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA does not presently allow CBD-infused food, drinks, or dietary supplements to be sold, and hasn’t yet provided regulations for hemp-derived CBD products.

In addition to the federal regulation of CBD, the Farm Bill also gave states the option to regulate and prohibit the cultivation and commerce of CBD. States may regulate CBD in food, beverages, dietary supplements, and cosmetic products independently, even before the FDA finalizes its policies.

Cannabis became legal for medical purposes in 2008 under the Michigan Compassionate Care Initiative. Michigan also legalized cannabis for adult use in November 2018 under The Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act. CBD derived from cannabis is legal for all Michigan residents, although it is subject to regulations.

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The 2018 Farm Bill legislation does not mean that CBD derived from hemp is universally legal throughout the United States. According to the Farm Bill, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has the power to regulate CBD product labeling, including therapeutic claims and the use of CBD as a food additive.

The 2018 Farm Bill re-classified hemp as an agricultural commodity and made its cultivation federally legal. Further, the act removed some forms of cannabis from Schedule 1 status by creating a legal distinction between hemp and marijuana. Hemp is cannabis with less than 0.3% THC, and marijuana refers to cannabis with more than 0.3% THC. This distinction in federal law effectively legalized CBD that is derived from cannabis with less than 0.3% THC, as long as it has been cultivated according to federal and state regulations.

Michigan consumers can purchase hemp-derived CBD products from CBD-specific stores and health shops. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

The FDA has declared that even hemp-derived CBD may not legally be added to food and beverages, or marketed as a dietary supplement. Although the organization has begun to re-evaluate some of its stances on legal CBD products, the FDA has not revised its regulations. The agency also has been strict in its position against any labeling that could be perceived as a medical claim about CBD.