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cbd oil for ulcerative colitis

There is no clear explanation of what causes inflammatory bowel diseases, and as of right now, scientists are still trying to find a cure for them.

These recommendations are based on the alleged anti-inflammatory benefits of specific herbs upon consumption.

Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are the two most prevalent types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While the two conditions may involve similar symptoms, they have different causes and should be approached from different angles.

Other Remedies for IBD

Some CBD supplements are formulated with herbs such as Aloe Vera, Boswellia serrata, and turmeric. You can also mix different herbal remedies on your own, but we first recommend consulting a doctor knowledgeable about complementary medicine before you start your first trials.

The cause of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease isn’t fully understood. However, scientists suspect that hereditary factors are the major players in the development of these conditions.

If you’re flirting with the idea of taking CBD oil for ulcerative colitis, this article will give you a detailed look into the scientific research on this subject on top of sharing some handy tips for using CBD.

As mentioned, CBD has remarkable anti-inflammatory and painkilling effects. On top of that, it can modulate the inflammatory response of the immune system by improving communication between its cells. Numerous studies have mentioned these qualities in relation to a wide range of health conditions, including IBD and its symptoms.

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic, long-term illness that causes inflammation of the colon and rectum. Symptoms may include diarrhea, rectal bleeding, passage of mucus, and abdominal pain. It is characterized by periods of acute flares when people experience symptoms as well as periods of remission when symptoms stop.

The second study comparing two cannabis cigarettes (23 mg THC/day) to placebo cigarettes showed lower disease activity index scores in the cannabis group compared to the placebo group. C-reactive protein and fecal calprotectin levels (both measures of inflammation in the body) were similar in both groups. No serious side effects were reported. This study did not report on remission rates.

The effects of cannabis and cannabis oil on ulcerative colitis are uncertain, thus no firm conclusions regarding the effectiveness and safety of cannabis or cannabis oil in adults with active ulcerative colitis can be drawn. There is no evidence for cannabis or cannabis oil use for maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis. Further studies with a larger number of participants are required to assess the effects of cannabis in people with active and inactive ulcerative colitis. Different doses of cannabis and routes of administration should be investigated. Lastly, follow-up is needed to assess the long term safety outcomes of frequent cannabis use.

To assess the efficacy and safety of cannabis and cannabinoids for the treatment of patients with UC.

Two studies including 92 adult participants with ulcerative colitis were included. Both studies assessed cannabis therapy in participants who had active ulcerative colitis. No studies that assessed cannabis therapy in participants with ulcerative colitis in remission were identified. One study (60 participants) compared 10 weeks of treatment with capsules containing cannabis oil with up to 4.7% D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to placebo in participants with mild to moderately active ulcerative colitis. The starting dose of cannabidiol was 50 mg twice daily which was increased, if tolerated, to a target of 250 mg twice daily. The other study (32 participants) compared 8 weeks of treatment with two cannabis cigarettes per day containing 0.5 g of cannabis, corresponding to 11.5 mg THC to placebo cigarettes in participants with ulcerative colitis who did not respond to conventional medical treatment.

Genetics also seems to play a significant role in the onset of UC, since it can run in families. Ulcerative colitis also has what is called a ‘bimodal distribution,’ which means there’s a risk of it occurring at a younger age (in the 20s and 30s) and then again at an older age (60s and 70s). According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 million people in the country suffer from inflammatory bowel disease, the majority of which have ulcerative colitis.

Simply put, it is hypothesized that CBD may be effective for ulcerative colitis because of its ability to function as an anti-inflammatory. The National Institute of Health’s PubChem database, for example, lists cannabidiol (the scientific name for CBD) as being “devoid of psychoactivity,” and as having both analgesic (pain-relieving) and anti-inflammatory properties.

On a federal level, CBD products that are extracted from industrial hemp are legal to possess and use in all 50 U.S. states. On the state level, however, there are still a few regions where use and possession of the compound is not so widely accepted. In North Carolina, for example, police recently arrested a vape store owner for selling bottles of CBD oil, even though the oil came from perfectly legal industrial hemp.

CBD for Ulcerative Colitis – How Might It Work?

For those UC patients who are still entirely in the dark as to what CBD is, it is essentially a natural component of the cannabis plant. However, it deserves little affiliation with the stereotypical perception of cannabis, as it produces no high whatsoever.

UC must also not be mistaken with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which is a disorder characterized by episodes of constipation, episodes of diarrhea, and relief after going to the bathroom.

If you do end up trying CBD, there are several high-quality CBD oil manufacturers currently selling legal products to all 50 U.S. states, but as always, we recommend that everyone do their own research (or better yet speak with their physician) in order to find a product that will work for them.

In more severe instances that are not responsive to conventional treatment, surgery may be necessary to remove portions of the large intestine that are most affected. In some instances, it is possible to cure ulcerative colitis with surgical removal of the colon (via a process known as a colectomy). However, invasive surgery always presents its own risks – particularly among elderly patients.