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cbd oil for social anxiety

Treating anxiety or any other mental health issue shouldn’t cause you more anxiety. If you’re interested in an effective treatment that has no adverse side effects on the mind or body, consider giving CBD oil a try.

CBD comes with a much lower risk. Those with anxiety can take CBD and not have to worry about adverse side effects that could be deadly. So why is CBD so different?

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There are several factors that play a role in the overall experience you have when taking CBD oil. Whether you’re a new or experienced user, you’ll not only need to find the dosage that works best for you, it’s also important to take CBD regularly in order to get the full range of benefits.

Fear and anxiety are adaptive responses that are essential for our ability to cope with threats to our survival. However, when fear and anxiety become excessive, it can be extremely disabling. One condition where this occurs is general social anxiety disorder, or SAD. SAD is a common anxiety condition which has detrimental impacts on a person’s social life (Bergamaschi, 2011). SAD is characterised by excessive anxiety in social situations, or where a person may feel judged, for example speaking at meetings, or public speaking. SAD has a profound impact on sufferers and this is particularly serious for teenagers who may stop going to school and withdraw from any social communication. People who suffer from anxiety disorders in general may have a diminished sense of wellbeing, may be more likely to experience relationship breakdowns, unemployment and have an elevated suicide risk. There is a huge economic burden associated with anxiety related disorders (Blessing et al., 2015). Although SAD is a common anxiety disorder, there is an absence of good quality research into this debilitating condition, meaning that the cause of SAD and the treatment of the disorder are not fully understood.

Fig 1. Scores of Fear of Negative Evaluation Questionnaire (FNE) in the participants who received CBD and in the participants who received placebo. The participants were evaluated before and after treatment. Error bars represent SDs. * indicates significant difference from pretreatment measurement. Fig 2. Scores of Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) in the participants who received CBD and in the participants who received placebo. The participants were evaluated before and after treatment. Error bars represent SDs. * indicates significant difference from pretreatment measurement.

Personal Response

SAD is a common anxiety condition which has detrimental impacts on a person’s social life.

Existing evidence supporting cannabidiol
Blessing and colleagues published a paper in 2015 that reviewed the existing evidence for the use of CBD to treat anxiety-related disorders. It appraised the evidence from a broad range of studies to include preclinical evidence, human experimental studies and epidemiological studies (Blessing, et al.). The findings indicated that animal studies support the use of CBD to treat anxiety related disorders. The team also found that human studies are supportive of the anti-anxiety effects of CBD, but there was a need for further research in this area to support the use of CBD as a treatment option for specific anxiety related conditions, and also to investigate which are the optimum levels of dosing.

Cannabidiol to treat SAD: new findings
Professor Masataka and colleagues have recently published their exciting clinical trial investigating the effects of CBD on teenagers experiencing SAD in Frontiers in Psychology. This trial shows promising results concerning the treatment of SAD with CBD. Masataka and colleagues recruited 37 Japanese teenagers with SAD who were randomly allocated to receive treatment with either CBD, or a placebo for four weeks treatment. The placebo treatment contained olive oil and the CBD treatment contained 300mg of CBD oil. The treatment was administered by a clinical psychologist, unaware of the teenagers’ treatment allocation, at the participants’ home. Anxiety was measured before and after treatment using the Fear of Negative Evaluation Questionnaire and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. The teenage participants were followed up for 6 months after their treatment for brief health checks. In this trial neither the researchers nor the teenage participants were aware whether they had received the placebo treatment or treatment with CBD.