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cbd oil and methadone

That said, scientific enterprise is a slow-moving and cautiously critical machine, and we still have much to learn about the medicinal uses of CBD. In fact, there remains a substantial gap between the hype surrounding CBD and the actual evidence guiding its medicinal use.

It is worth reiterating and highlighting that the study compared CBD to a placebo group, and did not compare to other opioid agonist treatments, such as therapy with methadone (Methadose) or buprenorphine (Suboxone).

Medicinal uses of cannabidiol

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The researchers concluded:

Further, to suggest that CBD is an effective treatment for opioid use disorder is misleading and harmful, as this misinformation could be used to justify not initiating, or discontinuing, opioid agonist medications.

The study medication used in this study, EPIDIOLEX, is a n FDA-approved medication that is dispensed through a pharmacy (not to be confused with “medical marijuana , ” which is comprised of a wide variety of non- federally- regulated cannabis projects ) . EPIDIOLEX is a plant-derived CBD liquid formation. P articipants were randomly assigned to receive 400 mg of CBD, 800 mg of CBD, or a placebo medication. CBD or placebo was administered once daily for 3 days . In addition to measuring the effect of the medication on opioid craving, anxiety, the authors also collected measures of positive and negative emotions, vital signs (skin temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate), and salivary cortisol levels , which measure stress response.

One of the hypothesized factors contributing to these barriers is that methadone and Suboxone can be misused or diverted because they can produce euphoria . Consequently, discovering effective alternative medications that can also treat opioid use disorder that circumvent concerns about their psychoactive properties could help more of those affected . To address this problem , the authors investigated whether the cannabinoid , CBD , which is thought to be safe and non-addictive, could be useful in the treatment of opioid use disorder .

At three time points – immediately after the CBD or placebo administration ; 24 hours after the CBD or placebo administration ; and 7 days after the third and final CBD or placebo administration – p articipants were exposed to drug – related and neutral cues . The 3-minute neutral cue condition consisted of a video showing relaxing scenarios, such as scenes in nature. The drug cue condition was a 3-minute video that showed intravenous or intranasal drug use, depending on the participant’s reported preferred route of drug use . Immediately after the presentation of the videos , participants were also exposed to neutral objects or to heroin – related paraphernalia (e.g., syringe, rubber tie, and packets of powder resembling heroin) for 2 minutes. Authors examined whether patients who received CBD, compared to those who received placebo, showed differences in opioid craving, anxiety, positive and negative emotions, or vital signs , after being exposed to the drug or neutral cues.

HOW WAS THIS STUDY CONDUCTED?

This was a randomized clinical trial with 42 participants who received one of two different CBD medication doses or a placebo once daily for 3 days and were then exposed to drug-related or neutral cues to see whether CBD could reduc e opioid cravings and anxiety – factors strongly associated with relapse to opioid use .

The widespread use of heroin and prescription opioids in the United States during the past decade has resulted in an unprecedented epidemic of opioid addiction, and few treatments for heroin use disorders are currently available. In this study, authors conducted a clinical trial to test whether cannabidiol (CBD), a non-intoxicating cannabinoid that is found in the cannabis plant, could reduce drug craving and anxiety in recently-abstinent individuals with heroin use disorder. The study found that, compared to those who received a placebo, individuals who received a dose of CBD medication showed a reduction in craving for heroin as well as reduced anxiety, which lasted for about a week after taking the CBD medication.

In the past decade, there has been an unprecedented spike in opioid use disorde r , which has led to more than 300,000 opioid-related deaths in the United States . O pioid use disorder medications such as methadone and buprenorphine (often prescribed in a formulation with naloxone , known by the brand name S uboxone ) help reduce opioid use and reduce risk for opioid-involved overdoses . In some areas, however, t hese medications are often underutilized and therefore can be difficult to access, creating a treatment gap in which those who need medications face barriers to actually receiving them. Further, 20-40% of opioid use disorder patients do not want to take agonist treatments .

Participants were recruited through advertisements. Most participants indicated preference for intranasal heroin use, most reported currently using more than 10 bags of heroin (one bag = 1 g) daily, and on average, participants had been using heroin for over 10 years. The majority of participants (64.3%) had been abstinent from heroin use for less than 1 month.

A 13-year-old patient with chronic cancer pain who was previously stabilized on methadone 7.5 mg twice daily was admitted to the ER with opioid-related side effects. These side effects started 5 days prior to the ER visit, which occurred about 2 weeks after her parents increased her dose of CBD oil 4-fold. After stopping CBD, the side effects resolved. CBD may increase methadone levels by inhibiting the cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and CYP2C19 enzymes, which metabolize methadone. This is the first case report suggesting there is an interaction between CBD and methadone. The interaction appears to be dose-dependent – in this case, it occurred with a very high dose of CBD but not with a much lower dose. More evidence is needed to verify this interaction and to determine the CBD dose threshold at which it might occur.

A new report suggests that taking cannabidiol (CBD) might increase methadone levels and increase its side effects. This is especially concerning in chronic pain settings such as cancer.

Many patients and their families don’t disclose the use of natural medicines such as CBD and other cannabis products to their healthcare providers. It’s important to discuss the use of all cannabis-derived products with patients and their families. Healthcare providers should ask directly about CBD use and be aware of its potential drug interactions.

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