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cbd oil and cluster headaches

Most people will be familiar with the occasional mild headache. But for sufferers of more severe migraines or cluster headaches they can be severe and life altering. And with a wide range of possible treatments, but no guaranteed cures, it’s not surprising more and more people are looking at CBD for migraines and cluster headaches.

There are currently no absolute medical cures for migraines and cluster headaches, but treatments to prevent attacks and relieve symptoms range from over-the-counter painkillers for migraines, to injections and electrical nerve stimulation for cluster headaches.

What causes migraines and cluster headaches?

Migraines are more severe, and can mean some people are confined to their bed for days at a time. There are various types including:

CBD Oil is taken orally, with 1 to 3 drops twice a day dropped under your tongue and held there for a minute before swallowing.

Prevention methods include a generally healthy lifestyle, reducing stress and tiredness, quitting smoking, and medication in the case of cluster headaches.

Aims: A case report suggested the efficacy of cannabis to treat cluster headache (CH) attacks. Our aims were to study the frequency of cannabis use in CH patients, and the reported effects on attacks.

Methods: A total of 139 patients with CH attending two French headache centers filled out questionnaires.

Results: Sixty-three of the 139 patients (45.3%) had a history of cannabis use. As compared to nonusers, cannabis users were more likely to be younger (p < 0.001), male (p = 0.002) and tobacco smokers (p < 0.001). Among the 27 patients (19.4% of the total cohort) who had tried cannabis to treat CH attacks, 25.9% reported some efficacy, 51.8% variable or uncertain effects, and 22.3% negative effects.

Conclusions: Cannabis use is very frequent in CH patients, but its efficacy for the treatment of the attacks is limited. Less than one third of self-reported users mention a relief of their attacks following inhalation. Cannabis should not be recommended for CH unless controlled trials with synthetic selective cannabinoids show a more convincing therapeutic benefit.

The study included a total of 127 participants who suffered from chronic migraines and cluster headaches, severe headaches that occur on one side of the head, often around an eye. Migraine pain usually affects both sides of the head and is often accompanied by light sensitivity and nausea.

In another win for marijuana research, a study has found that the active compounds in cannabis are more effective at reducing the frequency of acute migraine pain than prescription migraine meds, and with fewer side effects.

The study reinforces earlier research showing that medical marijuana is effective at reducing the frequency of migraines, and it adds to a chorus of research findings pointing to marijuana compounds as less risky alternatives to prescription pain meds. A number of clinical trials are underway to determine whether drugs made from the compounds could supplant opioids as a go-to painkiller, and thereby lessen the burden of opioid addiction. Those trials will take some time, but it’s encouraging that research is moving steadily in the direction of discovering the therapeutic potential of marijuana compounds. With potentially enormous upsides, like reducing how many people are hooked on opioids, it’s imperative that the research continues.

The results showed that THC-CBD was slightly better at reducing the frequency of migraine attacks than the commonly prescribed med (40.4 % versus 40.1%, respectively). And the THC-CBD drug was very effective at reducing migraine pain, cutting it by 43.5%.

The drug was also effective at reducing the severity of pain in cluster headache sufferers, but only if they had a history of migraines from childhood on.