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cbd for fever

If eating cannabis appeals to you on your sick day(s), we caught up with Robyn Griggs Lawrence, author of The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook. She says when she’s feeling under the weather she turns to:

Passing around a joint amongst friends is a fun but quick way to spread germs, so be careful who you light up with.

It comes on like a freight train: sore throat, stuffy nose, cough, body aches, and malaise. And that’s just the common cold. The flu ups the ante with all those symptoms plus fever, severe headache, and extreme exhaustion—in some adult cases vomiting and diarrhea, although those are more common in kids.

But before you light up that bong…

As for flu symptoms, he says cannabis may also have “antipyretic or fever-reducing properties, due to its ability to suppress the immune system.”

So…wouldn’t it just be nice to get high and feel better?

From a naturopathic perspective, we did reach Dr. Shawn Meirovici, a Toronto-based ND who specializes in pain management. He reiterates there is no direct link between cannabis use and treating colds and the flu. However, he said there is new evidence suggesting symptoms can be managed if cannabis is used responsibly.

Think about it: heat and smoke are the last things your throat needs when it’s already itchy and sore. Then, imagine hot smoke entering phlegmy lungs; Meirovici cautions that smoking can further irritate mucus membranes, making a cough or sore throat even worse.

Very few people make it through the winter without an annoying cold or a runny nose. Some of us will also catch the flu.

Cannabis and especially its two major compounds, CBD and THC, have been known to ease many symptoms of the common cold. CBD is a potential anti-inflammatory which can fight pain, such as sinus pressure, while THC can reduce common pains associated with these viruses which allow the body to rest and self-heal. While smoking marijuana isn’t recommended when sick as it can cause respiratory irritation, other forms of the plant can be used such as CBD oil . Furthermore, CBD has become a favorite item in recent years for its immune strengthening properties.

How Do We Get Colds and Flus?

With that said, it doesn’t mean that you have to catch a cold or flu intentionally. If you look after your body, by living a healthy lifestyle and resting well, your cells will be strong enough to avoid infection. You simply won’t have weak cells that need to be flushed out of your system. And for that, we sometimes need a natural helping hand. Remember, most people do not die from viruses, but bad colds and the flu certainly do cause a lot of pain and discomfort.

Once the virus enters a cell, it will either use that cell’s resources to replicate itself, eventually breaking the cell in search of a new cell, or, incorporating itself into the DNA of your cell. This allows the virus to be passed down through natural genetic duplication (mitosis) and cellular division (cytokinesis).

According to Dr. Robert J. Melamede, Chairman of the Biology Department of the University of Colorado,

Cannabidiol (CBD) has gained a reputation as something of a “cure-all.” Its antioxidant , anti-inflammatory , and analgesic properties have seen the cannabinoid, and cannabis itself, become a commonly suggested remedy for all manner of ailments, from chronic pain, to anxiety, and more .

That said, it’s important to recognize that there is currently no scientific research or clinical evidence suggesting that CBD could be effective in safely managing any specific symptoms of COVID-19.

“There is currently absolutely no evidence that CBD can play any role in altering the course of coronavirus (COVID-19) disease and I would strongly urge the CBD industry to stay far away from making any suggestion, however subtle, that it does,” Dr Andy Yates, science lead at the Association for the Cannabinoid Industry, told Food Navigator .

In March of this year, there were several claims that such anti-inflammatory painkillers, such as ibuprofen, could make cases of coronavirus worse. However, these concerns have since been largely put to rest. The UK’s Commission on Human Medicines has confirmed there is no clear evidence that using ibuprofen to treat symptoms such as a high temperature can make coronavirus worse.

Last week, one CBD retailer in Idaho took down a message on their e-commerce website which mentioned coronavirus, following a caution from federal regulators.