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cbd dependence

Because CBD doesn’t produce the high associated with THC, it’s potential for abuse is considered limited by scientists. A March 2017 study published in the Journal of Drug and Alcohol Dependence examined details of a previous study where researchers administered various oral dosages of CBD to frequent marijuana users alone and in combination with smoked marijuana. The researchers determined that CBD had as much likelihood for abuse as the placebo in this study.

CBD has also demonstrated the potential to curb the use of other addictive substances. In a preclinical animal study published in Neuropsychopharmacology on March 22, 2018, researchers applied CBD gel to lab rats that had a history of voluntary alcohol or cocaine use and showcased addiction-like behavior. The study concluded that CBD was effective in reducing drug use in the rodents, and also reduced common side effects of drug dependency, such as anxiety and impulsivity.

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Marijuana-derived CBD is extracted from marijuana plants that are usually grown for their intoxicating properties. Unlike hemp-extracted CBD, marijuana-derived CBD oil often contains levels of THC that exceed the federal 0.3% limit. In the event the CBD oil has particularly high levels of THC, an individual could possibly experience cannabis withdrawal symptoms if the oil was used to excess. CBD oil with THC levels above 0.3% is only available in states with medical or adult-use cannabis legalization.

A 2011 study concluded that CBD has a better safety profile compared to THC and other cannabinoids. Researchers found that high doses of CBD of up to 1,500 milligrams per day were well-tolerated by the human subjects. Compared with THC, CBD did not impair motor or psychological functions, nor did it alter the heart rate, blood pressure, or body temperature.

This non-intoxicating cannabinoid has also shown promise in human models. A May 2019 study, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, found that CBD could be effective in reducing cravings associated with heroin addiction. To conduct the study, researchers recruited 42 adults who had been using heroin for an average of 13 years. The subjects were divided into three groups: one group was given 800 milligrams of CBD, another 400 milligrams of CBD, and another a placebo. Compared with the placebo, those who were administered CBD significantly reduced both the craving and anxiety induced by the drug cues.

This could lead to a failed drug test of your urine, blood, or saliva.

CBD, while it does not cause a “high,” is said to cause a number of things in those who use it.

No, CBD alone doesn’t cause a person to feel high or intoxicated. CBD does not interact with the receptors in the brain that cause the euphoric or “feel-good” effect of marijuana.

FAQs:

In states that have legalized marijuana, both recreational and medical, standards are often higher when it comes to all hemp and cannabis products — including CBD oil products.

Among the test subjects who received doses of a high amount of CBD (1500 mg and 4500 mg), there were small detectable effects, but the effects were much weaker than those seen from many other drugs, specifically alprazolam (Xanax) and dronabinol (Marinol) in this study.

Another effect that THC and CBD have in common is nausea — especially when it is the first time someone is trying CBD or THC, nausea and/or vomiting are possible. This is mostly true when someone takes too much of either substance.

The key in finding CBD with no THC is making sure the product is derived directly from the hemp plant. This will take time, research, and a clear understanding and trust of where you are purchasing the product.