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cbd clinical trials for pain

CBD is commonly used to address anxiety, and for patients who suffer through the misery of insomnia, studies suggest that CBD may help with both falling asleep and staying asleep.

Cannabidiol (CBD) has been recently covered in the media, and you may have even seen it as an add-in booster to your post-workout smoothie or morning coffee. What exactly is CBD? Why is it suddenly so popular?

The evidence for cannabidiol health benefits

CBD stands for cannabidiol. It is the second most prevalent of the active ingredients of cannabis (marijuana). While CBD is an essential component of medical marijuana, it is derived directly from the hemp plant, which is a cousin of the marijuana plant. While CBD is a component of marijuana (one of hundreds), by itself it does not cause a "high." According to a report from the World Health Organization, "In humans, CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential…. To date, there is no evidence of public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD."

CBD may offer an option for treating different types of chronic pain. A study from the European Journal of Pain showed, using an animal model, CBD applied on the skin could help lower pain and inflammation due to arthritis. Another study demonstrated the mechanism by which CBD inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain, two of the most difficult types of chronic pain to treat. More study in humans is needed in this area to substantiate the claims of CBD proponents about pain control.

Side effects of CBD include nausea, fatigue and irritability. CBD can increase the level in your blood of the blood thinner coumadin, and it can raise levels of certain other medications in your blood by the exact same mechanism that grapefruit juice does. A significant safety concern with CBD is that it is primarily marketed and sold as a supplement, not a medication. Currently, the FDA does not regulate the safety and purity of dietary supplements. So, you cannot know for sure that the product you buy has active ingredients at the dose listed on the label. In addition, the product may contain other (unknown) elements. We also don’t know the most effective therapeutic dose of CBD for any particular medical condition.

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

The overall aim of this study is to examine the effects of orally does tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) on chronic pain symptoms, specifically we will examine the effects of different doses of THC/CBD on symptoms of chronic pain and life functioning. Participants will include individuals with chronic pain, who will be randomized into one of three intervention conditions: high THC/low CBD, low THC/high CBD, or placebo.

Secondary Endpoints: Determine if there are changes in neuropsychological performance, mood, visual acuity, rates of adverse events, and changes in blood chemistry, following 5 days administration of CBD/THC or placebo.

Detailed Description

3. History of cannabis use.

Primary Endpoints: Primary endpoints will consist of clinical symptom measures of pain severity, intensity, and quality; functional behavior; and the impact or interference of pain with daily functions, and differences in brain metabolism, connectivity, and structure to determine the effect of THC/CBD or placebo after 5 days of administration.

The overall aim of this study is to examine the effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) on chronic pain symptoms, specifically we will examine the effects of different doses of THC/CBD on symptoms of chronic pain and life functioning. Participants will include individuals with chronic pain, who will be randomized into one of three intervention conditions: high THC/low CBD, low THC/high CBD, or placebo. In addition to receiving THC/CBD/placebo, participants also will complete symptom assessments of chronic pain data (intensity, quality, interference/disability) throughout the study. These measures will be gathered prior to and following the fifth doses (dosing will occur once per day for five days) of CBD/THC or placebo. Other important objectives include the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), acquired before and after final administration with CBD/THC or placebo to examine differences in brain metabolism, brain connectivity, and brain structure. Imaging analyses will focus on regional brain changes before and after administration of THC/CBD/placebo. A secondary objective will be to examine the association between clinical and neurocognitive variables and use of CBD/THC, including the potential side effects of THC/CBD.