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cannabis oil effects

CBD’s exact mechanism of action is unclear. Unlike THC, CBD has a relatively low affinity for cannabinoid receptors in the brain. These are the molecules to which THC binds to elicit its psychoactive effects.

In an analysis of 14 published studies (nine involving animals and five involving humans), scientists with the University of Montreal concluded that CBD showed promise in treating people with opioid, cocaine, or psychostimulant addiction.

Health Benefits

CBD oil is an extract of Cannabis indica or Cannabis sativa—the same plants that, when dried, make marijuana. CBD oil is believed by some to treat pain, reduce anxiety, and stimulate appetite in the same way that marijuana does, but without its psychoactive effects. CBD has also shown promise in treating certain types of seizures.

There is some evidence that CBD interacts with seizure medications such as Onfi (clobazam) and boosts their concentration in the blood. Further research is needed.

There have also been suggestions that CBD may aid in the treatment of cannabis and nicotine addiction. Further research is needed.

Topical cannabidiol oil was studied in 29 people with lower limb peripheral neuropathy. After using the oil for 4 weeks, the people had less intense and sharp pain and fewer other uncomfortable sensations.

CAUTION: Taking CBD with other herbs that cause drowsiness or sleepiness may increase this effect.

Medical cannabis users reported they used cannabis with higher CBD and lower THC concentrations for their insomnia. They also reported a decrease in the time required to fall asleep.

Medical Research

CBD is not psychoactive; it does not have a mind-altering effect.

There are, in fact, dozens of cannabinoids, as well as other substances in cannabis sativa.

The dose of CBD also depends on the form and strength and whether or not it has other active ingredients.

Studies looked at the use of cannabinoids (THC alone and CBD combined with THC) in people with chronic pain. In general, there were improvements in pain measures, but they were not statistically significant.