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cannabidiol or cbd

Cannabidiol is most commonly used for seizure disorder (epilepsy). It is also used for anxiety, pain, a muscle disorder called dystonia, Parkinson disease, Crohn disease, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Some medications changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), haloperidol (Haldol), ondansetron (Zofran), propranolol (Inderal), theophylline (Theo-Dur, others), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, others), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

How effective is it?

Cannabidiol is a chemical in the Cannabis sativa plant, also known as marijuana or hemp. Over 80 chemicals, known as cannabinoids, have been identified in the Cannabis sativa plant. While delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the major active ingredient in marijuana, cannabidiol is also obtained from hemp, which contains only very small amounts of THC.

Some medications changed by the liver include theophylline (Theo-Dur, others), omeprazole (Prilosec, Omesec), clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo), progesterone (Prometrium, others), lansoprazole (Prevacid), flutamide (Eulexin), oxaliplatin (Eloxatin), erlotinib (Tarceva), and caffeine. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Brivaracetam (Briviact) Brivaracetam is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down brivaracetam. This might increase levels of brivaracetam in the body. Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Carbamazepine is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down carbamazepine. This might increase levels of carbamazepine in the body and increase its side effects. Clobazam (Onfi) Clobazam is changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down clobazam. This might increase the effects and side effects of clobazam. Eslicarbazepine (Aptiom) Eslicarbazepine is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down eslicarbazepine. This might increase levels of eslicarbazepine in the body by a small amount. Everolimus (Zostress) Everolimus is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down everolimus. This might increase levels of everolimus in the body. Lithium Taking higher doses of cannabidiol might increase levels of lithium. This can increase the risk of lithium toxicity. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Brady CM, DasGupta R, Dalton C, et al. An open-label study of cannabis-based extracts for bladder dysfuntion in advanced multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler 2004;10(4):425-33. View abstract.

Sativex oromucosal spray. Summary of product characteristics. GW Pharma, Ltd. Available at: https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/medicine/23262. Updated: May 2015. Accessed: May 31, 2015.

Possibly Effective for

Chesney E, Oliver D, Green A, et al. Adverse effects of cannabidiol: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2020. View abstract.

De Filippis D, Esposito G, Cirillo C, et al. Cannabidiol reduces intestinal inflammation through the control of neuroimmune axis. PLoS One 2011;6(12):e28159. View abstract.

Singh RK, Dillon B, Tatum DA, Van Poppel KC, Bonthius DJ. Drug-Drug Interactions Between Cannabidiol and Lithium. Child Neurol Open. 2020;7:2329048X20947896. View abstract.