Can Good Weed Have Seeds

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Buy Cannabis Seeds Online

How To: Spot Top-Shelf Quality Cannabis How else would you know if that avocado is ripe enough without examining it closely or giving it a good squeeze… you know getting your senses involved. The Navigating the cannabis seed market can be tricky from a legal perspective. Get the answer to your top questions about buying cannabis seeds today. Is it bad to find seeds in your weed? What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about? There’s a seed in my cannabis bud! What does this mean? Is it

How To: Spot Top-Shelf Quality Cannabis

How else would you know if that avocado is ripe enough without examining it closely or giving it a good squeeze… you know getting your senses involved. The same applies to weed. You need to get your senses involved. That’s one of the reasons we hate the new trend of putting weed in glass jar tin cans. They don’t allow you to examine the weed before purchasing it. But that’s another discussion for another day.

A guide to ensuring you’re not getting jerked + actually are getting top-shelf cannabis:

Smell it.

You never want your weed to have a grassy, hay smell or smell of ammonia. That’s an instant sign of some low-quality bud. Either it wasn’t dried properly, cured properly or a mixture of both. Always looks for some type of a distinct smell — pungent, citrus-y, pine-y, diesel. Something that is pleasing to the nose. Make sure it doesn’t smell like chemicals. How would you know? You’d be able to tell. Chemicals hit the nose in an unnatural way. There’s a big difference between the smell of a diesel, pungent aroma vs. a chemical aroma. If the smell makes you go ‘mmmm…’, you should be straight.

Examine it.

Cannabis is a plant. It should look pretty. Is it heavy in trichomes? Trichomes are those tiny little crystals that usually cover the bud. They tend to be shiny, sticky + always carry the most amazing aromas. If the bud isn’t covered in a blanket of frost, it’s not it. Has it been trimmed properly? Weed that hasn’t been properly trimmed are usually signs of a rushed job. If they’re cutting corners on manicuring the weed for bag appeal, where else did they cut corners? Does it contain any seeds? Top-shelf bud should be sinsemilla—it should never contain seeds. If you find a seed, that just means some issues came about during its growth cycle, but it shouldn’t be too big of an issue. If you find a seed in a strain you like, save it. If you find multiple seeds, that’s a major red flag that the bud is not high quality.

Touch it.

You may not always get to touch the bud, but when you do check for freshness + density. You never want bud that feels a bit too moist or too dry where it’s crumbling. The former could mean it wasn’t properly dried and the latter could mean it hasn’t been properly stored. Always opt for buds that are sticky to the touch with a bit of weight. Some strains are light + airy, while others are denser. The main thing to look out for is a bud that’s too light or too airy. That is a sign of not receiving enough light during the flowering phase resulting in a less potent bud.

Is the price reasonable or too good to be true?

In New York City, an eighth of quality bud can cost anywhere from $50-$75. From your local dealer, $40 is a reasonable deal. If you’re paying less than $40 for an eighth, you’re more than likely getting some mids. Be wary of $25 eighths. While it’s definitely smokable, there’s probably something wrong with it in terms of overall quality—not potent enough, wasn’t cured properly, dried out, etc. If you’re paying more than $60 + it’s in a branded bag, find a new person. Don’t waste your time on whatever Gelato they just put in a branded bag.

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A guide to buying cannabis seeds

The first couple months of the year is a great time to start planning your cannabis garden to get a head start on the outdoor growing season, which roughly runs from March to November, depending on where you live.

Navigating the cannabis seed market can be challenging when states have different degrees of legality. This guide will answer your questions on buying seeds so you can be on your way to growing your own cannabis.

Is it legal to buy marijuana seeds?

Marijuana seeds are considered a cannabis product just like flower, edibles, and concentrates. Their legality depends on which state you live in. People living in states with adult-use legalization can buy, produce, and sell seeds within their own state, but seeds can’t cross state lines. People living in states with medical marijuana legalization can only buy seeds if they have a medical card.

See also  Seeding Weed

Seed banks exist outside of the US and can sell them for “souvenir purposes,” but it is illegal to bring seeds into the US and Customs will seize any cannabis seeds they find in packages or on a person.

An update on laws that affect buying weed seeds

In April 2022, the DEA released a letter clarifying the legality of cannabis seeds. A lawyer wrote the DEA, arguing that because a cannabis seed itself contains less than 0.3% THC, they should be considered hemp, which was legalized in 2018.

The lawyer’s argument was that the material itself—the seed—was less than 0.3% THC, whereas the law has always considered weed seeds illegal because they will turn into a cannabis plant that will have more than 0.3% THC.

The DEA wrote back to the lawyer agreeing, and saying that if a marijuana seed contains less than 0.3% THC, it is not a controlled substance.

However, the letter from the DEA is an “official determination” and not law. The legality of buying and transporting cannabis seeds across state lines is still murky, but the DEA’s position does pave the way for more relaxed laws on weed seeds.

Where can I buy cannabis seeds?

Many world-renowned seed banks are overseas in the Netherlands, the UK, Spain, and other countries where cannabis laws are less restricted, and in recent times, quality seeds banks have popped in legal states in the US. Seed banks provide seeds from a variety of different breeders.

In states with adult-use legalization or a medical marijuana program, you can buy seeds within your own state, either at a dispensary or through a specific seed company’s website.

Can you buy cannabis seeds online?

Before you purchase seeds online, you’ll need to figure out what strain you want to grow and what breeder you want to buy from.

Because US federal law still technically prohibits cannabis (see update on laws that affect buying weed seeds, above), it can be hard to find information on seed banks and breeders. Breeders who have a long history and positive reputation are usually a good place to start.

Check out our explainer and buying guide to cannabis seed banks for more info on buying seeds.

To get an idea of what well-established breeders look like, check out:

Europe

US

You can also do some research and find an online grow journal that details the whole growing process of a specific strain from a particular breeder. Through these, you’ll be able to look over another grower’s specific notes and see pictures of the final results.

If you grow some seeds and like the results, try growing another strain from that same breeder and see how it goes.

Do dispensaries sell cannabis seeds?

Some dispensaries in medical and adult-use states sell seeds, but not all. Be sure to check or call ahead to see if they sell seeds. Buying marijuana seeds at the dispensary is far more straightforward, however, your options will be more limited than shopping online.

Dispensary staff should be able to give you information on the seeds they’re selling, but keep in mind that a lot of dispensaries focus on selling flower and consumable products. It’s a good idea to call ahead and talk to staff to see if they are knowledgeable about seeds and can give you specific information on growing.

How to look for quality genetics when buying marijuana seeds

Breeders talk about “unstable genetics,” meaning that a seed’s origin is unknown. Make sure that when you buy a packet of seeds that it or the breeder who produced them can list where the seeds came from and how they were crossed and/or backcrossed to get the seed that you hold in your hand. If you can’t get a seed’s history, it could be anything and the result of poor breeding practices.

An inexperienced breeder might cross a male and a female one time and sell the resulting seeds as a new hybrid strain, but professional breeders usually put their strains through several rounds of backcrossing to stabilize genetics and ensure consistent plants that reflect those genetics.

Which marijuana strain should I grow?

Even one weed plant can produce a lot of buds come harvest time, so make sure you grow a strain you like. Note strains you enjoy when you pick something up at the dispensary or smoke with friends, and look for seeds of it when you want to start growing.

Some strains are easier to grow than others because they are more resistant to mold and pests, so if you’re new to growing, you may want to try an easier strain to start.

See also  How Much Are Cannabis Seeds

Some strains also take longer to grow than others. Depending on whether you’re growing indoors or outdoors, you may want to grow a quick-finishing marijuana strain if you live in a climate that gets cold and wet early in the season. For example, indicas are known for having a shorter flowering time than sativas.

Check out our lists of different marijuana strains to choose a strain to grow.

What’s the difference between regular, feminized, and autoflower seeds?

Regular cannabis seeds

If you buy a packet of regular seeds, they’ll come with a mix of males and females. A lot of cultivators prefer to grow these because they haven’t been backcrossed—essentially inbred—as much as feminized or autoflower seeds.

You’ll need to sex out the seeds once their reproductive organs show during the flowering phase and discard the males—because they don’t produce buds and will pollenate females, resulting in seeded bud.

What are feminized cannabis seeds?

Seeds can come feminized, meaning you can just put them in soil and start growing for buds. These seeds are guaranteed to be bud-producing females and growing them cuts out the step of having to sex out plants and discard the males.

It also reduces the risk of having a stray male sneak into your crop—just one male can pollinate a huge crop, causing your females to focus their energies on producing seeds instead of buds.

What are autoflower cannabis seeds?

Autoflower plants change from the vegetative to flowering state with age, not the changing of their light cycle. They have a short grow-to-harvest time and can be ready to harvest in as little as 2 ½ to 3 months from when you put the seeds in the ground.

The downside is that, typically, they are less potent, but autoflower seeds are great for people who want to grow cannabis but don’t want to spend a lot of time doing it.

How much do marijuana seeds cost?

Cannabis seeds usually come in a pack of 10 or 12 seeds and start at around $40 a pack and go up from there. Some high-end genetics can run between $200 to $500 a pack.

Feminized and autoflower seeds will cost more because more breeding work was put in to create them, and they take less time for the grower to get buds.

How many cannabis seeds should I buy? Are they all going to survive?

When you grow any amount of seeds, a percentage of them won’t germinate, even if you get them from a reputable breeder. Always count on a few not germinating or dying off, or roughly 1/4 of the total you put in the ground.

When growing regular seeds, some won’t germinate and some will have to be discarded because they’ll turn out to be males. With feminized seeds, some won’t germinate, but a higher percentage of them will turn into flowering plants because there won’t be any males.

If you want six total cannabis plants to harvest for buds and are growing from regular seeds, start with about 9 or 10 seeds. Some won’t germinate and some will turn out to be males, and then you’ll want to discard down to the six best phenotypes.

If growing feminized seeds, you can probably start with a couple more seeds, 7 or 8. A couple won’t germinate, and then discard down to the six best phenotypes.

Make sure to always stay within your state’s legal limit of growing plants.

How do I buy strain-specific cannabis seeds?

Strains like Blue Dream, Gelato, and Original Glue have gained in popularity in recent years. Check out these resources on how to buy these types of cannabis seeds:

Cannabis seed buying FAQ

What is the difference between male and female marijuana seeds?

Gender in a cannabis plant can’t be determined from looking at the seed; the seed has to sprout and mature in order to determine the sex of a plant. Only females produce buds, whereas male plants produce pollen.

Why do you have to germinate seeds first?

Germination is the first essential phase of a cannabis plant’s life, when it first sprouts and grows leaves. Growers looking to bypass seeds and germination can start from a cannabis clone.

What’s the best way to store cannabis seeds?

Store seeds in a dry, airtight container, so moisture can’t get in. If storing for a long time, keep them in a fridge or freezer.

Will customs confiscate my cannabis seeds?

Despite the DEA’s letter from April 2022, cannabis seeds are technically still illegal and will be confiscated if found on a person or in the mail.

Is it bad to find seeds in your weed?

What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about?

There’s a seed in my cannabis bud! What does this mean? Is it good or bad?

See also  Male Marijuana Seeds

Sometimes you don’t see the seeds until they fall out of your buds

What causes seeds in buds?

Seedy buds are the result of pollination. What does that mean? Cannabis buds are flowers. Like other flowers, they make seeds when pollinated. Cannabis buds get pollinated when they come into contact with cannabis pollen while the buds are forming.

Seeds happen when pollen gets on the hairs (pistils) of buds as they’re forming. In other words, seeds in weed are caused by pollination.

This bud is full of fat seeds because pollen got on the pistils during bud development.

Pollen typically comes from the pollen sacs of a male cannabis plant. Male plants spray pollen everywhere when their flowers are mature. Sometimes female cannabis plants will produce pollen (known as herming) due to genetics or stress. Any source of pollen, whether the plant is male or female, can pollinate buds in the vicinity and cause seedy buds.

If you’ve found seeds in your buds, it happened while the plant was growing. Either the grower didn’t identify and remove all the male plants before they released pollen, or a herm was involved that self-pollinated or pollinated other buds in the grow area.

Does it mean the weed is bad?

Seeds in your buds aren’t good or bad. They are simply the result of pollination while the buds were growing. A few seeds here and there won’t make much difference in potency, though potency may be lower if the buds are very seedy.

The main problem with seedy weed is that you are getting less smokeable bud for the amount of total mass there. If buds are seedless, you get more bang for your buck. Seedless buds are known as “sinsemilla” (“sin semilla” is Spanish for “without seeds”) and are considered to be the highest quality and most potent type of weed.

Seedy weed is fine to smoke, though you should remove the seeds if possible (they have no THC and will pop if you smoke them). Unless there are tons of seeds, bud potency is unlikely to be affected.

Are “found” seeds good to grow?

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed (seeds you find), but results may be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and the yields or quality may not be as expected.

The biggest problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. The resulting buds may end up nothing like the buds you found them in.

That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder. This ensures each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency you expect.

If you’re not sure what strains to get, here are a few recommended favorites. These strains produce excellent weed and are generally easy to grow. Click the links for more information.

    – top-shelf looks and smell with classic effects reminiscent of 90s buds but stronger. Easy to grow. – this version is MUCH more potent than regular White Widow. The buds tested between 24-26% THC. Don’t plan to do anything else that day ? – for those who are looking for a face melter. These buds test up to 28% THC and produce buds with quintessentially “American” looks and smell. The mental and physical effects may be too intense for most beginners. is a good choice for commercial growers with high THC up to 30%, big yields, and a short flowering time. is a potent Sativa hybrid with great yields and uplifting unique mental effects is an autoflowering strain that produces photoperiod-quality buds in about 70 days from seed to harvest.

Platinum Cookies is essentially a more potent version of the popular Girl Scout Cookies strain.

How can I tell if it’s a viable seed?

Mature cannabis seeds are typically dark brown or tan (the brown is a coating that can be rubbed off), and relatively hard. Very pale or white seeds usually won’t sprout.

However, I have been surprised to find some very flimsy or pale seeds sprout and produce amazing plants (we aren’t breeding cannabis for hard seeds after all). When in doubt, I highly recommend doing the true test to see if the seed is viable – try to germinate the seed and see if it sprouts !

The best way to tell if a seed is viable is simply to try germinating it

These seeds have germinated

These are all viable cannabis seeds. Every one grew into a healthy plant!

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