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Among proponents, spirulina has been used to support a number of health conditions, including fatigue, high cholesterol, high triglycerides, and viral infections.

Spirulina may offer some protection against oral cancer, according to one small study of tobacco chewers with precancerous oral lesions. For 12 months, study members took either a daily dose of spirulina or a placebo. By the study’s end, the lesions cleared up in 20 of the 44 participants who had consumed spirulina (compared to three of the 43 participants who had been assigned to the placebo group).  

High Cholesterol

Spirulina holds some promise in the treatment of allergic rhinitis (nasal allergies), according to a review published in 2009.   Indeed, a previously published study of people with allergic rhinitis found several benefits for spirulina consumption, including improvement in symptoms like nasal discharge, sneezing, congestion, and itching.  

If you have a thyroid condition, an autoimmune disorder, gout, kidney stones, phenylketonuria, or are pregnant or nursing, spirulina may not be appropriate for you. You should check with your healthcare provider before taking it.

Although there are a large number of blue-green algae species commonly referred to as “spirulina,” most spirulina supplements contain Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Spirulina maxima, and/or Spirulina platensis.

There is no established ideal dose of CoQ10. Studies have used doses of CoQ10 ranging from 50 milligrams to 1,200 milligrams in adults, sometimes split into several doses over the course of a day. A typical daily dose is 100 milligrams to 200 milligrams. Follow the instructions on the bottle or get advice from your doctor or a dietitian. Keep in mind that different supplement brands might have different ingredients and strengths.

CoQ10 has also been studied as a preventive treatment for migraine headaches, though it may take several months to work. It has also been studied for low sperm count, cancer, HIV, muscular dystrophy, Parkinson’s disease, gum disease, and many other conditions. However, the research has not found any conclusive benefits. Although CoQ10 is sometimes sold as an energy supplement, there is no evidence that it will boost energy in a typical person.

Although CoQ10 plays a key role in the body, most healthy people have enough CoQ10 naturally. There is some evidence that adding more — in the form of CoQ10 supplements — may be beneficial. Increasing age and some medical conditions are associated with dropping levels of CoQ10. But in these cases, it’s uncertain that adding CoQ10 will have an effect.

Can you get CoQ10 naturally from foods?

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a nutrient that occurs naturally in the body. CoQ10 is also in many foods we eat. CoQ10 acts as an antioxidant, which protects cells from damage and plays an important part in the metabolism.

The amounts of CoQ10 in found naturally in food is much lower than that found in supplements. Good food sources of CoQ10 include:

Though still controversial, some preliminary evidence suggests that CoQ10 may help to prevent or treat the adverse effects, such as muscle pains and liver problems, of taking statin-type cholesterol drugs.

Preliminary studies have shown that CoQ10 may slow, but not stop, the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Additional research is needed to confirm this effect.