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anxiety treatment with cbd

The researchers noted that additional trials will be important to examine the outcomes of CBD among patients with other anxiety-related disorders, such as general anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. They also suggest that future studies should explore the optimal dose and administration route for CBD and assess its safety in the long term.

A growing research trend has focused on the anti-anxiety properties of cannabidiol (CBD) — a compound found in the Cannabis plant. Unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CBD does not produce a “high”, and studies have yet to uncover any evidence of abuse or dependence in humans.

“There are still many questions that need to be addressed and rigorously studied,” Wright said. “The only human studies examining CBD as a treatment for anxiety have been conducted in patients with social anxiety disorder, therefore, research is needed in patients with other anxiety disorders, such as generalized-anxiety disorder and panic disorder. Secondly, much remains unknown about the use of CBD as a treatment for anxiety, such as the most effective route of administration, appropriate doses to be used, and its long-term safety and efficacy.”

The research team behind the review, led by Madison Wright, notes that anxiety disorders are the most common mental health disorders worldwide. Despite the pervasiveness of anxiety disorder diagnoses, existing behavioral treatments offer limited effectiveness and the current pharmacological treatments carry unwanted negative consequences.

“Following the recent push to legalize cannabis in many jurisdictions, CBD has gained a lot of attention from the public and scientific community for its potential therapeutic properties. Given the data demonstrating that CBD is well tolerated and demonstrates little potential for abuse or dependence in humans, we were interested in reviewing the animal and human literature on its use as a treatment option for anxiety disorders.”

First, findings from pre-clinical animal studies show that low to medium doses of CBD produce anxiety-reducing effects, while high doses increase anxiety. Animal research also offers evidence that the anxiety-relieving effects of CBD involve the serotonin receptor 5-HT1A. While on the whole, this research shows compelling support for CBD as an anxiety treatment, the researchers note that these studies have only been conducted among male animals.

Wright and her colleagues reviewed the current findings from both pre-clinical and clinical trials to shed light on the potential role of CBD in the treatment of anxiety.

1. What exactly is CBD? Is it the same as Cannabis? Hemp? Marijuana plant?

Only for the FDA approved product.

3. It seems like CBD is now being used in lots of products (shampoos, cosmetics, oils, bath salts, etc.). Does it really help when it is part of a product?

Look for scientific evidence to support any claims – controlled trials, evidence that the product under discussion has been assayed by some legitimate source to verify chemical constituents. Engage in a conversation with a medical professional.

4. Does CBD based medication really help with anxiety and depression and has it been scientifically proven to help with anxiety and depression?